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Recent Acquisitions

Ancestry Library

Author: Ancestry Library Edition by ProQuest

The Ancestry Library Database permits Willard Library patrons to search for, print, and save census, birth, marriage, death, and immigration records; historical newspaper documents; maps; and much more. The database is only able to be accessed while in Willard Library, either on a public access terminal or on your personal wireless device (free WiFi is available at Willard Library).

Recent Acquisitions

Celebration of Our Heritage 2008 Weinzaepflen/ Weinzapfel

Author: 2008 Reunion Committee

A family History of the Weinzapfel Family

Recent Acquisitions

The Washingtons of Wessyngton Plantation

Author: John F. Baker Jr
Publication Date: 2009-02-04

A descendant of Wes­syngton slaves, John F. Baker Jr., has written the most accessible and ex­citing work of African American history since Roots.

This fruit of more than thirty years of archival and field research and DNA testing spans 250 years. Baker has not only written his own family’s story but also includes the history of hundreds of slaves and their descendants, now numbering in the thousands throughout the United States. More than 100 rare photographs and portraits of African Americans who were slaves on the plantation bring this compelling American history to life.

Recent Acquisitions

African American Genealogical Sourcebook

Author: Paula K. Byers
Publication Date: 2005-01-01

RFH REF 929 Afri

As with all genealogical research, African American research begins with one’s self and works back one generation at a time. Back to a certain point, however, research becomes more focused on sources uniquely related to the African American experience, particularly in the 1800s. Beginners should start with page 15, “Basic Genealogical Research Methods and Their Application to African Americans” and then go to page 3, “Background Material—Things to Know Before You Begin.” These two chapters should provide a good foundation for a beginner in African American genealogy research.

Recent Acquisitions

The Complete Beginner’s Guide to Genealogy, the Internet, and Your Genealogy Computer Program.

Author: Clifford, Karen
Publication Date: 2001-01-01

RFH REF 929.1 Clif

For the beginning genealogist interested in Internet research, this is an excellent book to start with. It is generously illustrated, with an excellent first chapter full of good information on how the beginner can use strategies and resources to successfully achieve his/her goal. This book stresses the use of the computer for genealogy research and may be somewhat outdated; it refers to the floppy disk for storing data rather than the writeable CD, which is now the disk of choice.

Recent Acquisitions

Tracing Your Roots

Author: Consumer Guide
Publication Date: 1977-01-01

RFH REF 929.1 Trac

Amply supplied with photographs and charts that can be photocopied, this is a concise book offering basic information on beginning research, filling charts, and using resources. A quick read.

Recent Acquisitions

The How Book for Genealogists

Author: Everton, George B
Publication Date: 1964-01-01

RFH REF 929 How

A pocket-sized book with excellent information on getting started, especially the first chapter, “How to Begin.” In spite of its age, information on basic research is still valid and is never out of date.

Recent Acquisitions

The Genesis of Your Genealogy: A Simplified “Step-by-Step” Instruction Book for the Beginner in Genealogy

Author: Nichols, Elizabeth L
Publication Date: 1973-01-01

RFH REF 929.1 Nich

Think of this as a simplified self-help course in beginning genealogy, explaining terminology and demonstrating how to fill out charts, in a fun format

Recent Acquisitions

How to Trace Your Family Tree: A Complete and Easy to Understand Guide for the Beginner

Author: American Genealogical Research Institute
Publication Date: 1973-01-01

REF REF 929 Amer

A good overview for the beginning genealogist on the hows and whys of genealogical research. Shows charts and group sheets, and explains heraldry.

Recent Acquisitions

Suspicion

Author: Joseph Finder
Publication Date: 2014-05-27

Unable to afford the private school his daughter adores, single father Danny Goodman reluctantly accepts a loan from a wealthy man only to be forced to choose between false drug charges and an undercover DEA assignment targeting his best friend.

Recent Acquisitions

The One & Only

Author: Emily Giffin
Publication Date: 2014-05-20

Centering her life on the successful Walker family, into which she plans to marry, Shea struggles to end her affair with a less-than-stellar boyfriend only to have her entire existence placed in question by the death of the family's mother.

Recent Acquisitions

Skin Game

Author: Jim Butcher
Publication Date: 2014-05-27

Chicago wizard Harry Dresden must help a hated enemy, Nicodemus Archleone, break into a high security vault to steal something belonging to the Lord of the Underworld

Recent Acquisitions

Ghost Ship

Author: Clive Cussler
Publication Date: 2014-05-27

Waking with conflicted memories after an injury sustained while trying to rescue passengers from a sinking yacht, Kurt Austin searches for answers from a state-sponsored cybercrime ring that takes him from Monaco to North Korea.

Recent Acquisitions

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

Author: Benjamin Alire Saenz
Publication Date: 2012-02-21

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz



This book will keep pleasantly surprising you. Aristotle and Dante are two Mexican-American high schoolers who meet at the start of summer at a swimming pool, and from there the novel follows them through friendship together during summer months and apart during the school year. I expected a coming-of-age defined plot, and I got a lyrical novel more about the back and forth than too many defined events, and that was just fine. This is a good read for ages 12 and up.

Saenz has a way of talking about what we don’t talk about: loneliness, friendships, love, parents, dreams, sexuality. Even being Mexican-American but not feeling either way either Mexican or American. And it’s so beautifully written. While the beginning can feel a bit melodramatic, it’s because you’re inside Ari’s head and he thinks a lot more than he ever says. And the more you read in Ari’s head, the more you like it. He has such a lovely way of observing the people around him and of seeing the universe, while at the same time having such an anger about the world.The contrast and similarities between Ari, who feels a lot but expresses almost nothing, and Dante, who also feels a lot but expresses it all with an astounding openness, take each of them to heights of humanity (or, the secrets of the universe) in ways they could not without done each other. They loved each other as best friends, and then they fell in love as more than best friends.

Structurally, the lyrical novel has such a nice symmetry with summers. You can feel the boys growing up just from one summer to the next, from reading about their experiences, moods, and feelings. The chapters can be super short, but it’s refreshing. This book is recommended for those who enjoy poetic coming-of-age stories.



~Olivia Tooker, Willard Library Student Intern and Caffeine-addicted Bibliophile

Recent Acquisitions

The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making

Author: Catherynne M. Valente
Publication Date: 2012-05-08

This is the kind of book you want to read aloud, so you don’t miss one single word. It’s charming. It’s fun. It’s quirky. All the characters you meet are a delightful mix of well-known and completely original. You want to hear all the sounds September hears, taste everything, see it all, and feel it all. While the plot-line is a familiar to all those classics (down-the-rabbit-hole, follow the yellow brick road, etc.), it brings in a modern voice and modern aspects.

September is the heroine and main character, and she is delightfully frank like many 12-year-old children. She acquires companions throughout the novel, like the Wizard of Oz, but are like none I’ve ever read: an almost-dragon who is also a third of a library and an almost-genie who is sad and shy and eats salt and stone.

My only complaint is that the chapters began to feel repetitive halfway through the novel. While the descriptions were completely different and the characters engaging, I felt the structure was not changing and neither were the outcomes. Girl meets Fairyland creature. Someone explains the creature. Something sad is discovered about the way Fairyland is run. Girl figures out one more thing about the Marquees that makes her dislike her a little more. But as soon as I got almost tired of it, September made the mistake of partaking in a fairy feast and began transforming into a tree, and things got vastly more interesting.

And, for the most part, there is enough mystery to keep you going throughout. When will the Key become important? Will we ever meet Queen Mallow? How will September get home to Nebraska? Will the Wyvern ever be unchained and able to fly again? These questions, and more, which I won’t spoil for you, drive the story through even if you can sense how the plot goes. Overall, an excellent modern fairy tale with rebellions, colorful characters, magic, and more. A good book for any middle school and above readers. It might even be a good chapter book to read at night, for each chapter is its own wonderful tale and then each word can be properly admired.

~Olivia Tooker, Willard Library Student Intern and Caffeine-addicted Bibliophile

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