Gardening Book List

Is your green thumb itching to get into a good book? You’ve come to the right place.

How to Grow Practically Everything

How to Grow Practically Everything

Packed with hundreds of gardening projects, from planting herbs in pots to creating a vegetable garden to feed the family, How to Grow Practically Everything gives complete beginners the confidence and know-how to grow almost anything. Each project is a complete package, with step-by-step photographic details and sumptuous end shots to ensure great results. How to Grow Practically Everything employs a user-friendly "recipe" formula free from intimidating jargon, covers different areas and types of gardens-from patios and terraces to beds and borders-and explores all the gardening basics, from identifying your soil to planting tips and pruning.

The Speedy Vegetable Garden

The Speedy Vegetable Garden

Author: Mark Diacono & Lia Leendertz
Publication Date: 2013-01-15

The Speedy Vegetable Garden highlights more than 50 quick crops, with complete information on how to sow, grow, and harvest each plant, and sumptuous photography that provides inspiration and a visual guide for when to harvest. In addition to instructions for growing, it also provides recipes that highlight each crop’s unique flavor, like Chickpea sprout hummus, stuffed tempura zucchini flowers, and a paella featuring calendula.

Powerhouse Plants

Powerhouse Plants

Powerhouse plants -- plants with colorful spring flowers and summer fruits, or summer fruits and fall foliage, or summer flowers, fall foliage and winter stems ... or any combination of two or more of these desirable features. Like flowering dogwood that boasts summer flowers and fall fruit and foliage. Or honeysuckle that has fragrant spring flowers, summer and fall foliage, and fall fruit.

"Powerhouse Plants" by Graham Rice features multiseasonal perennials, annuals, groundcovers, vines, shrubs, and trees. Profiles include basic plant information, including size, hardiness, and preferred growing conditions.

With this indispensable guide in hand, you can leave the slacker plants behind and get the most of your money and landscape

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